Amanda Bullick is an Amazing Photographer (interview)

Its not everyday that you come across an amazing photographer who’s style is  beautiful, sexy, morbid, raw, & elegant. Amanda Bullick’s photo’s truly captures the moment to the point of having chills. Looking at one of Amanda Bullick’s photo’s is the equivalent to watching a movie in Blu Ray. This Canadian woman has skills, and we here at Boy-Cott Magazine had the honor to interview her.

Boy-Cott: How are things with you in beautiful Vancouver, BC?

Amanda: Amazing!!! I love this city.  It’s the perfect dichotomy of pretty and gritty, heheh that rhymes.  What I mean is that Vancouver has this very fake, manicured, beautiful, magical side to it, and at the same time has this honest, harsh, dirty, super grimy side to it as well.  It’s so inspiring to me ‘cause I feel like my work has that same contrast.  I’ve only lived here for 3 years so I quite often still feel like a tourist in this city.  Looking at every building from top to bottom, every alley is it’s own little world, it still feels so new and exciting to me.  Which is invigorating for any artist, that feeling of not wanting to look down for a second in fear that I might miss something.

Boy-Cott: What attracted you to photography?

Amanda: To be perfectly honest, I started taking photos because I realized I sucked at most other types of art! My dad is an artist so I was pretty much exposed to every form of art growing up, but I was always a bit bummed out because my work never looked as good as his.  I began taking pictures in high school, got my first camera, took over the dark room and never looked back.

Boy-Cott: Your photography is beautiful, sexy, morbid, raw, & elegant. What triggers or  stimulates your thought process?

Amanda: Oh man, everything!!! My mind runs a million thoughts a minute!  Really though, from the ant on the sidewalk to the last film I saw, to the album that I have on repeat that week, to the rain, to bodily functions, it’s endless.  I’m an extremely emotionally driven, passionate person (sometimes to my detriment) which means I basically feel first, think or reason later, thus coming out in my work.   It’s all a trigger, if you can just let your mind wander, anything can take you on a journey of ideas. I’ve been told that ideas are a dime a dozen, it’s the process and the outcome that’s important.

Boy-Cott: In your bio it states that you “capture the unseen and unheard voices of the underground art scene”. Why do you stick to the underground scene?

Amanda: There’s something really special about any “underground” scene because it’s raw and pure.  It hasn’t been tainted by the ideals of the “industry”, it hasn’t had the chance to get a big ego, it just is.  I mean I can appreciate artists wanting to get their name out there, signing to labels or agencies, but it often changes the quality of the music/art.  When it’s underground it isn’t being over-thought or produced, it’s being made for the pure pleasure of creation, which I respect and relate to so much.

Boy-Cott: When you first started taking photo’s did you have a mentor?

Amanda: I didn’t really have a mentor but I always had a ton of love and support from everyone around me, which is critical when your trying to find yourself and figuring out how to express that.

I did have a wonderful art teacher, Mrs. Smith, in high school that really helped me along the way.  Like I said before, I took over the dark room and I was the only one that was allowed to use it.  Her and I would go in there almost every afternoon and teach each other what we knew or what we had researched that week, so it was more like a team than a mentoring scenario.  Either way, she really allowed me to experiment and was always there to help me with anything I needed.  In fact, if I had a question that she couldn’t answer, she’d research it that night and get back to me the next day.

Boy-Cott: At what point in your life did you realize that you want to make a living off photography?

Amanda: I really started taking photography seriously as a business when I started art college.  The funny part about deciding that you want to make a living off something (especially art) and actually being able to make a living off it, is that they don’t necessarily go together right away!  I decided years ago that this is what I wanted to “be when I grow up” but I must admit, I still live the glorious (I use that word sarcastically) life of the starving artist.

Boy-Cott: Have you traveled to different countries to do any shoots?

Amanda: Not yet, but I can’t wait for the opportunity!

Boy-Cott: What was one of your best shoots?

Amanda: One of my best shoots…hmmmm, that’s a tough one!  I’ve had many amazing shoots with such great people, but I must say I really did enjoy one that I did for a friend of mine that is a producer. It wasn’t really my best shoot, persay, but it was so disgusting and challenging that I would put it up there in my best shoots.  I titled the shot “where music comes from” and what we did was cover him in blood and guts, real guts.  The idea was to show him cutting himself open and pulling out what’s inside him, you know, intestines, wires, blood, organs, maybe a synth or two.  The standard things that musicians have in them!!  It was so great because the whole time we were all sooo grossed out that we had to light incense, I made a room spray that we tried to spray on the actual guts cause they were so smelly.  It was awesome!  It even came to the point of taking gag breaks from shooting!! What we do for the sake of art, I love it.  Aside from the smell and the gagging, the shots turned out great, we got just what we wanted.

Boy-Cott: What’s one of your big goals for 2010?

Amanda: Big things are coming this year, I can feel it! I’m in the process of starting a new specialized photography business, but it’s still in it’s concept stages.  I’ve gotten to this point in my life where I want to help people with my art.  I’d like to do something that could change someone’s life positively, even if it’s just one person. As you see I’m being kind of quiet about it for now, but my website will be constantly updated so you can check back and see what I’m up to. www.amandabullick.com

Boy-Cott: Who would you like to thank?

Amanda: The solid people for always being there.  As well as the not so solid for making me work harder and giving me those wonderful “life lessons”.

Here’s some more of her work:

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t’s not everyday that you come across an amazing photographer who’s style is beautiful, sexy, morbid, raw, & elegant. Amanda Bullick’s photo’s truly captures the moment to the point of having chills. Looking at one of Amanda Bullick’s photo’s is the equivalent to watching a movie in Blu Ray. This Canadian woman has skills, and we here at Boy-Cott Magazine had the honor to interview her.