The Fifth Element of The Femme Fatale Crew Speaks… (interview)

Interview by: Mamba

Header photo by: Kwestro

Misa “B-Girl Militia” Soliz. This woman is something else, haaa. Misa is a B-Girl, part time comedian, a hip-hop head and a very conscious individual.  When Misa is not sharing her outlandish rhetoric amongst friends and facebook familia, she’s in school, riding her bike, dancing at the South Austin Recreation center or kickin’ it with her man. In my book Misa is a full-time bad-ass. She has a heart of gold and limbs of steel. So if you ever get a chance to meet this “fly b-girl”, buy her a drink or show her some love.

Boy-Cott: How’s life been treating you these days Misa?

B-Girl Militia: Can’t complain. I got all my limbs and everything smells the way it should.

Boy-Cott: You recently went on a trip to New Mexico. What specific things about your trip stuck out to you as amazing or inspirational?

B-Girl Militia: So many faces like mine. I spent my adolescent years believing that I wasn’t beautiful because I didn’t have blond hair, or a heart shaped face. I was taught in school that the indigenous people are ” blood thirsty savages”, an actual quote from my 6th grade social studies book.

The people I met in New Mexico had a different mentality and because they were aware of their culture, their tribes, their heritage, they had a deeper connection to their identities. I felt that this awareness is an integral part to their creativity and ambition.  The people within the Apache Skateboards art collective are a prime example. They are bringing the people into their world while protecting it from the real savages.

 

I spent my adolescent years believing that I wasn’t beautiful because I didn’t have blonde hair, or a heart shaped face. I was taught in school that the indigenous people are ” blood thirsty savages”.

 

Boy-Cott: Before you moved to Austin years ago, you were a San Antonio resident. What made you want to make the move to the ATX?

B-Girl Militia: San Antonio is one of my homes ( I feel that I have scattered denizens around the country). I moved to Austin because I needed a change but still wanted to be in the same state as my family and it was my perception that Hip Hop was booming in Austin. I moved here during a sea of  change. The hipster culture was burgeoning while conscience hip hop was taking a back seat.

Boy-Cott: As an active B-Girl you’ve been faced with some conflict as far as you throwing jams. Do you think some of these promoters are jealous of your success?